The Crisis In Georgia: The Winners And Losers

August 31, 2008

The Crisis In Georgia: The Winners And Losers

It is now becoming apparent who are emerging as winners and losers from the war between Russia and Georgia over the breakaway regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia.Let’s talk about the winners first. Washington is one of the big winners. That’s why some people, including Russian Prime Minister Vladimir Putin and yours truly, were saying that the United States must have been responsible for igniting the fire. According to Putin, American role in this crisis was highlighted by the presence of ‘US citizens’ on the ground during the Georgian invasion of South Ossetia. Days before Putin’s statement I was writing on this website that the US had their fingerprints all over the crisis because they seemed to be too well prepared for the whole thing in terms of public relations.... 

Russia And China: Friends Or Reluctant Partners?

August 31, 2008

Russia And China: Friends Or Reluctant Partners?

Martin McCauley writes: Have you heard about the BRIC countries, Brazil, Russia, India and China? They meet occasionally to discuss the future world arrangement where they will be calling the shots. The BRIC countries, so that you know, account for almost half the world’s population and supposedly have the most dynamic economies. They are not natural allies: Brazil and India are friendly with the United States while Russia and China are keeping the yanks at a distance. Behind the scenes tensions exist within the BRIC group. India’s deal on nuclear power with the United States has revealed Washington’s determination to wean India away from its traditional friendship with Russia. Indian high technology imports of machinery and weapons are more likely now to come from the US... 

North Korea Senses US Weakness. And Revives Its Nuclear Ambitions

August 28, 2008

North Korea Senses US Weakness. And Revives Its Nuclear Ambitions

(By Martin McCauley) Washington is reeling. First, the Syrian President visits Moscow to conclude an alliance which could see Russian re-emerging as a military power in the Middle East for the first time since the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. Then, North Korea announces that it has stopped disabling its nuclear facilities (the Yongbyon reactor and the demolition of its cooling tower), accusing the US of reneging on a six party disarmament deal.On the face of it Pyongyang is angry that after it had delivered the report on its nuclear arsenal Washington did not remove it from the list of countries accused of state sponsored terrorism. The US claims its wants more stringent verification procedures to be put in place before it reviews the status of the Democratic People’s Republic... 

Are Oil And Gas Killing Off Democracy? It Sure Looks Like It

August 27, 2008

Are Oil And Gas Killing Off Democracy? It Sure Looks Like It

Martin McCauley writes: Back in 1959 the American political scientist, Seymour Martin Lipset, published a seminal article on democracy and economic development. He was fascinated by American society which he regarded as exceptional. How else was one to explain America’s economic and political dominance of the world at that time? Lipset coined the aphorism: ‘The more prosperous a nation is, the greater the chances it will sustain a democracy.’ In other words, if a nation wishes to become rich the best path to take is democracy. These words were written nearly 50 years ago. But is this true in today’s world? Can only democracies achieve prosperity? And how does one calculate which state is prosperous and which one is not: by the size of the Gross Domestic Product (GDP), by... 

Russia Raises The Stakes: Moscow Recognises The Independence Of South Ossetia And Abkhazia

August 26, 2008

Russia Raises The Stakes: Moscow Recognises The Independence Of South Ossetia And Abkhazia

The Kremlin has demonstrated its determination to continue scoring political points on the domestic front by raising the stakes in its stand-off with the West over the breakaway regions of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. Because make no mistake – this whole conflict with Georgia is played out by the Russian leadership primarily for domestic consumption, in an attempt to distract attention from the rapidly deteriorating economic situation in the country and the gross mismanagement of public finances and assets. In the latest development in this propaganda war President Medvedev has announced that Russia is officially recognising the independence of South Ossetia and Abkhazia. The announcement was made in response to the resolution adopted yesteday by both chambers of the Russian parliament... 

Russia and Syria: The First Fruits Of Moscow’s Victory In Georgia

August 22, 2008

Russia and Syria: The First Fruits Of Moscow’s Victory In Georgia

(By a leading political analyst.) The visit of President Bashar al-Assad to Moscow is a startling consequence of the Russian military victory in Georgia. He stated on his arrival: ‘We are ready to co-operate with Russia in any project that can strengthen its security’. He added that Russia needs to think of a response to the fact that it is being encircled by hostile nations. He made clear that he would be discussing the stationing of Russian missiles on his territory. The Syrians are also shopping for weapons. Syria is also expected to welcome back the Russian navy to Tartus, a base Russia lost with the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991. We are back again to the times when Syria was very close politically and militarily to Moscow. Syria is at present negotiating with Lebanon to... 

The US Have Their Fingerprints All Over The Conflict In Georgia. They Benefited Most From It

August 21, 2008

The US Have Their Fingerprints All Over The Conflict In Georgia. They Benefited Most From It

The United States have their fingerprints all over the conflict in Georgia. And you know how I know about it? Because already the US seem to have benefitted most from it. Yes they did, there is no question about it. Not to mention that they have been extremely well prepared for the supposedly ‘unexpected’ crisis in Georgia in terms of PR. Very well prepared indeed. Rolled out their PR guns in a matter of hours and even managed to pronounce all the unpronounceable Georgian names with ease. That last thing alone, by the way, proves that they have been rehearsing for some time. Let me explain where I am coming from on this. But before I start, let us all agree on one thing: Georgian President Mikhail Saakashvili would have never dared to challenge Russia militarily if he did not have some... 

The Conflict Between Russia And Georgia: No, There Won’t Be A New Cold War

August 19, 2008

The Conflict Between Russia And Georgia: No, There Won’t Be A New Cold War

Alexander Nekrassov writes: It is time to dispel some of the myths that surround the conflict between Russia and Georgia over the breakaway region of South Ossetia. There have been too many comments made by people who, obviously, are not that well informed about the situation that exists in both Russia and Georgia and who have been trying to cover up their ignorance by making sensational statements and predictions that have nothing to do with reality. Let’s first deal with the widely held view that as a result of the conflict relations between the West and Russia would deteriorate to such an extent that we would witness a new round of the Cold War. It makes great headlines, of course, but nothing could be further from the truth. First of all, the times of global military stand offs between... 

The War In Georgia Revealed One Stark Truth: It’s No Economic Success Story

August 18, 2008

The War In Georgia Revealed One Stark Truth: It’s No Economic Success Story

There is one striking revelation that came out during the war between Georgia and Russia: and that is that Georgia is not the economic success story that its government and the West are trying to portray. Quite the opposite, actually. Have you noticed the shabbiness of the Georgian towns and cities and villages that have been shown in news reports? I’m not talking here about the devastated buildings that had been damaged or destroyed during fighting. I’m talking about the overall state of things. Take the town of Gori, the birthplace of Joseph Stalin, for example: it has been in the news a lot because of the presence of the Russian troops there. How sad and grey and gloomy the town looked. It had a sense of despair and hopelessness about it. And what about the sea port of Poti on... 

We Are Monitoring The Health Of Two World Leaders. In A Good, Proper Way, That Is

August 18, 2008

We Are Monitoring The Health Of Two World Leaders. In A Good, Proper Way, That Is

We, at stirringtroubleinternationally.com, are monitoring the health of the Ukrainian President Viktor Yushenko (this is the correct spelling of his name), with a mixture of concern and great optimism. Concern, because Mr Yushenko has had a brush with death several years ago and should be taking things easy. Optimism, because we see that the Ukrainian leader shows no signs of slowing down and carries out his duties with vigour that can shame any fit and healthy person. Take last week, for example: Mr Yushenko found the time in his busy schedule to jet off to Georgia, along with the leaders of the three Baltic States and Poland, to demonstrate his support to the embattled Georgian President, Mikhail Saakashvili, who got himself into a serious mess by sending his troops to the disputed region... 

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